Kabala, “Church-State Relations in the Early American Republic”

This month, Pickering and Chatto Publishers will publish Church-State Relations in the Early American Republic, 1787-1846 by James S. Kabala (Rhode Island College). The renowned historian Gordon Wood has this to say about Kabala’s superb looking book: “This superb account of church-state relations during the most tumultuous years of American Christendom reveals that our present disputes over the separation of church and state are nothing new. Kabala’s deeply researched book contains the fullest and clearest summary that we have of the bitter struggles during the six decades following 1780 that led to the Protestant non-sectarian consensus of the 1840s.”  The publisher’s description follows.Church-State Relations in the Early American Republic

Americans of the Early Republic devoted close attention to the question of what should be the proper relationship between church and state. This issue engaged participants from all religions, denominations and party affiliations. Kabala examines this debate across six decades and shows that an understanding of this period is not possible without appreciating the key role religion played in the formation of the nation.

About these ads

2 responses to “Kabala, “Church-State Relations in the Early American Republic”

  1. Thanks for the free plug! May I ask how you learned of the book’s existence?

  2. You’re welcome! Our student fellows look hard for interesting and worthwhile new scholarship to notice on this site. Your book looks really excellent. I’ve ordered a copy and look forward to reading it. Marc

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s